Love the Things Your Lover Loves by Papernut Cambridge

This is a beautiful album, packaged beautifully. I play drums on it and sing a bit, I probably do some other daft shit on it as well.

The album on 2 x limited run 110g white vinyl 10″ records in plain white disco bags (one hole) with a postcard insert, all inside a printed 11″ x 14″ degradable white plastic carrier bag. Green/white artwork throughout.

Buy Love the Things Your Lover Loves on vinyl with download code INCLUDING POSTAGE AND PACKAGING


CD version/mixes of the album in green/white CD wallet with green/white onbody printing.

Love the Things Your Lover Loves 2 on CD INCLUDING POSTAGE AND PACKING


Buy the album on download direct from Papernut Cambridge…

Recognizer by The Great Electric

I love playing in the band. This is a beautiful seven inch on Where It’s At records. I only have a couple of copies of it at present.

A ten minute krautrock piece is split over both sides of this seven inch. I play synth and saxophone on it.

BUY THE SEVEN INCH HERE (INCLUDES POSTAGE AND PACKING…


Download for £1.50 can be bought here…

The Hayman Kupa Band Album

Gathering together a rhythm section consisting of Michael Wood (Whoa Melodic/Singing Adams) on bass and Cat Loye (Fever Dream) on drums, The Hayman Kupa band create brash, bold and effortlessly melodic power pop. Sharing writing duties and sometimes singing each other’s words, lines are blurred and creativity explored in a wonderfully exuberant collection of songs. The album, recorded in three days at Big Jelly Studios in Ramsgate, is an exploration of relationships and, at its heart, it’s the sound of a friendship being made.
Darren explains more about the collaboration and how they got the band together:

It’s only happened a few times but just once or twice I have seen someone on stage and thought, “I want to be in a band with them.” But I thought it the first time I saw Emma playing with her magnificent and under-rated band Standard Fare.

I met her properly a little later in Sheffield when we played together. Before the gig I said I was suspicious of bands that wore hats. She wore a hat on stage.

They say imitation is a form of flattery and I was glad that I noticed when I wrote the song “Boy, Look at What you Can’t Have Now” that it sounded like the sort of thing Emma might write. I covered up my theft by asking her to sing on it.

When we were recording the song I suggested that we should write a whole album of duets. Musicians suggest things like this all the time because they are stupid or drunk. A few months later Emma told me she had started writing the album. This is what Emma does; she says something then does it. I race to play catch up.

The songs were written over three weekends at her house and mine. Co-writing is something I’m not used to. It’s very intimate and me and Emma became friends through the process. Emma’s lyrics are sharp and precise whereas mine are more metaphoric. It was lovely seeing how quickly we settled into something in between. 

We talked about relationships and that’s what the album is about. It’s about our fears and paranoias and the search for trust and love. We deliberately swapped lines and genders so the narrative is never truly that of traditional duets. I sing Emma’s lines often and she sings mine. It’s two voices singing the results of our conversations. We became close friends whilst writing these songs.

We wanted a band to make the album and chose Michael Wood and Cat Loye. We never considered anyone else. They brought a brash, bold sound to the songs and we rehearsed twice and then recorded the album in three days at the Big Jelly studios in Ramsgate.

I was thinking about the Beatles and very early 1960s pop records. We recorded everything live including the vocals with only a handful of overdubs. 
We put a microphone high up in the ceiling to get bright, rackety sound and mixed it in mono.

 We recorded it two and a half years ago and it has remind locked like a time capsule whilst me and Emma released five other albums.

 I like this album a lot. It’s the sound of a friendship being made.

Buy the Hayman Kupa Band Album now

Order Hayman Kupa Band Album on CD INCLUDING POSTAGE AND PACKING


Order Hayman Kupa Band on vinyl with download code INCLUDING POSTAGE AND PACKAGING


Or download from Bandcamp for £7

Thankful Villages Volume 2 by Darren Hayman

English songwriter and former Hefner frontman Darren Hayman continues his journey around the United Kingdom’s 54 Thankful Villages. A Thankful Village is a village where every soldier returned alive from World War One.

An ongoing and hugely ambitious folk project, Thankful Villages is only partially concerned with the war itself, moreover it is a celebration of British rural life. Darren pulls together first person interviews, folk tales and songs, field recordings and his own personal experiences to create a vast patchwork depicting community, history and legend.

Thankful Villages Volume 2 is less an album but something akin to an arcane musical radio documentary. The success of the first volume of Thankful Villages has encouraged Hayman to go deeper into his subject. Themes of “the river” and “death” weave their way through these eighteen villages. A centuries old drowning is uncovered in “Arkholme” on bonfire night. Dennis, the river man, tells us of a tragedy on the Weir in “Cromwell”. Judy Dyble, the original singer of folk legends Fairport Convention, joins Darren in the village of “Upper Slaughter” and sings a lyric about the generations flowing like water through the village.

Darren uncovers two World War II air disasters in “Woodend” and “Wrigsley”, where he records in the abandoned control tower at the airfield, the so-called cemetery of lights. Perhaps the most shocking and miraculous of tales is found in “Flixborough” where in 1974 the local plastics factory exploded killing everyone inside but nobody in the lucky village. Derek and his son tell us the story of finding each other amongst shards of glass.

However, glimpses of light shine through the darkness; a sunny day of wild swimming in “Telisford”, a village fete with bell ringing in “East Norton” and a tale of a grateful Belgian Refugee in “Norton Le Clay”.

Thankful Villages Volume 1 garnered a great deal of media attention, with features in broadsheets including The Guardian, Financial Times, The Independent and The i Paper. Darren also appeared on The Verb with Ian Mcmillan, Loose Ends and interviewed for a feature on Radio 4’s PM programme.

Darren played special concerts around the release, doing a rendition of his Thankful Villages set with accompanying visuals and films, headlining with a full band as well as solo supporting British Sea Power. A collage of Britain’s hidden places, rich in history and community, Thankful Villages is a further chapter in Darren’s journey and a testament to his remarkable work ethic.

In 2016 Darren was awarded the title of ‘Hardest Working Artist’ at the AIM Awards for the Thankful Villages project and his prolific career.

Thankful Villages Volume 3, which will appear in 2018, has been given funding by the Arts Council.

Order Thankful Villages Vol 2 on CD INCLUDING POSTAGE AND PACKING


Order Thankful Villages Vol 2 on vinyl with download code INCLUDING POSTAGE AND PACKAGING


Or download from Bandcamp for £7

Tracklisting:

  1. Cundall (Yorkshire)
  2. Norton Le Clay (Yorkshire)
  3. Flixborough (Lincolnshire)
  4. Chantry (Somerset)
  5. Tellisford (Somerset)
  6. Woolley (Somerset)
  7. Shapwick (Somerset)
  8. Cromwell (Nottinghamshire)
  9. Wigsley (Nottinghamshire)
  1. East Norton (Leicestershire)
  2. Maplebeck (Nottinghamshire)
  3. Stretton En Le Field (Leicestershire)
  4. Nether Kellet (Lancashire)
  5. Arkholme (Lancashire)
  6. Colwinston (Glamorgan)
  7. Upper Slaughter (Gloucestershire)
  8. Woodend (Northamptonshire)
  9. Coln Rogers (Gloucestershire)

 

Classic Hefner T-shirts are Back!

awesome-t-shirt-preview-80907-darren-hayman-2The classic Hefner logo T-shirts are back. It might be longer than 10 years since I last had these printed. You used to see them all over Reading Festival didn’t you?

It’s a bit of an experiment, I’m not sure how many of you wear band tees so I’ve only printed 100, let’s see how we go.

Also after some solid market research (half an hour on twitter) I’m inclined to think that not many people wanted fitted women’s tees any more, apparently they’re a bit 90s, but if this goes well let me know what you’d like to see. Also let me know if there were any other designs from yesteryear you’d like to see come back.

They come in 3 colours (Grey, Light Blue and Navy) and five sizes.

Size Chest (to fit):
S – 34/36″ // M – 38/40″ // L – 42/44″ // XL – 46/48″ // XXL – 50/52″

Available in four sizes, and two colours.

Buy now, prices include P and P.



Trains by Darren Hayman (CD)

I’ve tried a couple of times to group together some train related songs. Recently I was asked to write a song about my favourite train which is the Class 108 Diesel Multiple Unit. I like it because you can see out of the front window.

Making this song inspired me to revisit some old train songs I had and prepare them for release.

The picture disk has sold out from me but I still have the CD version with 8 new songs.

Here’s a video for ‘Class 108 Diesel Multiple Unit’.

All prices include Postage and Packing.

Buy the CD here.


Or buy download for £7

Someone to Care For – Hayman Kupa Band – seven inch single

Buy the new single from the Hayman/Kupa Band on Static Caravan. Here’s the video.

 

SEVEN INCH SOLD OUT FROM ME! BUY THE DOWNLOAD BELOW!

Thankful Village #09 – Aisholt, Somerset

Aisholt is hidden in the folds of the Quantock hills in North Somerset. A tiny knot of buildings clustered behind incredibly narrow lanes. Tim Whittingham reads at humanist and non-religious funerals; he is also the Chair of the Friends of Aisholt. He raises money for the maintenance of the church even though he doesn’t go to church himself. The church, as in many of these places, is the heart of the village. It has a purpose outside that of religion. It binds the community together.

We met him the day before Remembrance Sunday and he read a poem for us by Dollie Radford about the Quantock hills.

Dollie Radford was a contemporary of William Morris and Tim knew that my previous project had been based on his words. I love it when these connections throw themselves up, when the songs seem to write themselves.

Peter is a church warden of Church of All Saints who invited us to his house for soup and tea. We sat and spoke with his wife and then he took us up the clock tower. Peter showed us the clock mechanism and I recorded it slowly clicking and whirring. We stood on top of the church tower and saw the hills surround and look down on us.

Peter asked if we would return the next day to record the village singing on Remembrance Day. The next day the sun shone and the church was full. I recorded the bells ringing and choir singing. I wove them in time with the clock mechanism and Tim’s soft patience voice.

dradford01I wrapped them around themselves just like the green rolling fields envelope the village. Aisholt is all warmth.

Imogen Griffiths took the photos and did the filming.